Author Archive

Wouldn’t it be Nice…

Posted in Beth A.'s Entries on December 3, 2009 by Elizabeth A.

Wouldn’t it be nice if the answers for everything were right out in the open?

In some ways, yes and no. Yes, because then most of us wouldn’t have been holding our breaths for the past 5 weeks, especially now as the project comes to a close. This project would have been less stressful as well. However, I’m glad to say that there isn’t an answer book out there. I’m glad that there isn’t one written. Having something like that out in the real world would kill everything this project has allowed us to do-really think, and the creativity to do so.

I never thought of Alice in Wonderland and Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland would ever have so much hidden meaning behind it. I never thought that the author would have been in love with the person to whom he has written. In my opinion, it came as a shock to me, I mean, who would have thought of drugs, hookah, and death be in a children’s story. Besides, they made a Disney movie as this! I was completely flabbergasted.

However, further investigation with help from my group and my fellow peers on other blogs have helped with my understanding. So, to those who have helped with this project, thank you.

To Mr. Long, thank you for this wonderful experience that I never want to end.

Disney+Tim Burton=Outlandish and Tantalizing

Posted in Beth A.'s Entries on December 3, 2009 by Elizabeth A.

Another rendition of Alice in Wonderland will be unvailed to the world in March. Disney is doing another creation of theirs, but with Tim Burton, not necesarily a common person that brings bright colors and joy to the screen. While, in my opinion, he is a great director, he tends to be a tad strange, or different, but the overall product is awe-inspiring. Though, Disney already did an animated version of Alice in Wonderland, so why make another? Why go through all the time and effort just to re-do a Disney Classic?

Well, Tim Burton is one of those directors that is one of a kind.

In the past couple of movies of his, Johnny Depp has starred, or voiced a character. And yes, he appears in this one, as the Mad Hatter. Quite a few differences I have noticed off the bat. For one, Alice is older, a teenager basically. In the book, she’s about 7. Another thing, Alice accidentally goes down the rabbit-hole in the movie, compared to her willingly following the rabbit down the hole as is in the book. Why? Why are they changing it? I think that they want to try and attract older audiences with this film, rather the animated was predominately popular amongest children. This one can attract teenagers to adults, which means more money for Disney. I just wish that Disney could stick to the story, like they did with The Little Mermaid and Aladdin to name a few. It frustrates me, and I mean, the book is still out here today! Though, I applaud their choice of directors, Burton can give this innocent fairytale an unthinkable twist, and I’m excited to see what that is.

The Truth Behind the Pen

Posted in Beth A.'s Entries on December 3, 2009 by Elizabeth A.

Charles Dodgson isn’t exactly a household name. In the literary world it has a spec of importance. He was just a regular man, working in his professional world in London during the 19th century.

Now, Lewis Carroll, on the other hand, mention his name in literary community, and ‘Alice’ should be the first word you hear. Lewis Carroll wrote many books, including his Alice series. Now, as I like to know, why did Dodgson use a pen name? Why not just use Charles Dodgson?

Contrary to what some believe, he did not want to familiarize himself with Alice Liddell. Yes, they do have the same number of letters and letter pattern, Alice Liddell wasn’t even a factor in the equation. According to this WikiAnswers page, Dodgson’s name was chosen by Edmund Yates. Dodgson wanted to keep his literary life and professional life seperate, not be stopped on the streets like some celebrity. How Yates formulated his name is intriguing.

Lutwidge became Ludovic, which became Lewis. And Charles became Carolus, which became Carroll. Evidence for this? There is one actually. Before Alice, Dodgson published Solitude under his pen name, Lewis Carroll, in March 1856. Alice Liddell wasn’t in Dodgson’s life until the next month of April, which is when he first met her.

Martha Stewart Better Watch Out

Posted in Beth A.'s Entries on November 19, 2009 by Elizabeth A.

In our last CoverItLive session, our group came up with a metaphor for Alice‘s entirety. Basically, Carroll does have all of his ingredients laid out for this story, and when he puts them all into the bowl, the batter is lumpy and doesn’t work out so well, yet when you back that lumpy mix, his cupcakes came out to be delicious-but a different type of delicious. A type of deliciousness that no one has ever tasted before, but the overall feedback of his cupcakes are high. So high, to where it puts Carroll on the map, at least amongst London.

So, what do you think Carroll’s ingredients for success are?

In my opinion, here’s what his “ingredient list” may have looked like:

  • Childhood innocence: Obviously, Alice is 7 in the story, so there is that innocence that she has of “doing somethings wrong, but it’s OK because she doesn’t know better” kind of thing.
  • On the path to adulthood: In many parts, Alice abandons her innocent cliche, to be more responsible, and more aware of her surroundings. She minds her manners, but at times she does forget about them and simply speaks her mind.
  • Losing sanity: How do we know this is really happening to Alice? Why does it seem so realistic to her? Is she insane, or sane? Is she sane in the real world but insane in Wonderland?
  • Normal v.s. abnormal: What is normal in Wonderland? I find to think that Alice is considered abnormal in Wonderland, because everything is so completely off-balanced compared to Alice’s “normal”. Maybe that’s what Alice wants normal to be?
  • Math and Word Plays: “lessons” and how they ‘lessen’; the tortoise “taught us”; Alice counting in very odd way (but according to the annotation actually makes sense in some strange mathematical way) and those are just a few examples.
  • Satrical remarks: Though, we today may not understand them, but the jokes that Carroll makes (usually about the French) may have been very popular in Victorian England, and have just died of their funny, yet they sit maintain their wit.

I believe those are the main “ingredients” in Carroll’s cupcake mix flavored, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

So, Pillsbury dough boy, Betty Crocker, Martha Stewart, Rachel Ray, and all of the baking greats better watch their backs, because there is a new baker in town.

“Lewis” the Ripper

Posted in Beth A.'s Entries on November 17, 2009 by Elizabeth A.

His love for a young child would be frowned upon nowadays, and was most likely kept secret back then. That love created one of the most notable stories ever told. After poking around a few search engines here and there, I found a very peculiar idea-the idea of Charles Dodgson actually being Jack the Ripper.

For those who don’t know about Jack the Ripper, he was an unidentified serial killer that startled the area around and in Whitechapel, London, England during late 1888. His victims were mainly female prostitutes, and those victims were killed in a rather gruesome manner. Any who, I read an article (http://www.casebook.org/suspects/carroll.html) explaining Richard Wallace’s theory.

His theory, which was explained in his book Jack the Ripper, Light-Hearted Friend, is that he believes both Carroll and his colleague, Thomas Vere Bayne, committed the Whitechapel murders. Now, there is absolutely no physical evidence, but Wallace does have a lot of circumstantial evidence. For one thing, we know how Carroll loves his little word games, including creating anagrams. Wallace is able to turn his most harmless rhymes or verses, into graphic and basic details of some of the killings. However, some of the anagrams had to substitute letters and such, poking a hole in his theory. Another thing, Wallace rearranged the letters in some phrases, and also created details of the killings, but that could be done also. Though, through all of this ‘evidence’, the likelihood of Carroll actually being Jack the Ripper is pretty slim to none. Perhaps there is a possibility? Carroll did have an infatuation with Alice Liddell and probably other small, young girls.

I don’t believe that Carroll could have committed such horrendous murders. He was too preoccupied in pleasing Alice or something of that sort, and he was a somewhat celebrity, how could have he have done these things without being caught? The idea itself is rather intriguing and eerie. The thought of the author of a beloved children’s story being a serial killer?